Recycling – what and where

This is the 2nd segment of the short series on recycling opportunities.

Recycle logo.2The list of what’s recyclable continues to grow, as do the opportunities of where and how to do so. Here is a current list and links to help you locate drop-off points.

  • A growing variety of batteries and cell phones can be dropped off at your local transfer station, as well as at national retailers such as Home Depot and Target. Or check out call2Recycle.org for drop-off sites.
  • Paper – including office white paper, newspaper, glossy magazines, etc. – can be recycled curbside in most communities.
  • Many types of plastic can now be recycled. Some communities are even beginning to accept polystyrene (styrofoam), though check with your Solid Waste department on this. #5 plastic containers are generally not yet curbside but some Solid Wastes are accepting them if you bring them in. And check out Preserve’s “Gimme 5″ program as well.
  • the Bag-2-Bag program lets you recycle single-use plastic bags and other films

    the Bag-2-Bag program lets you recycle single-use plastic bags and other films

    Many types of plastic can now be recycled. Some communities are even beginning to accept polystyrene (styrofoam), though check with your Solid Waste department on this. #5 plastic containers are generally not yet curbside but some Solid Wastes are accepting them if you bring them in.

  • Don’t forget single use plastic bags, dry cleaner bags, packaging shrink wrap and other “films”. Though not accepted curbside, almost every food store and many retail stores have a bin to help recycle those. Just bundle them up and take them in!
  • Another great option for plastic bag recycling is the Bag-2-Bag program. Hilex – an industry-leading manufacturer of plastic bag and film products – has placed over 30,000 bins outside retailers across the U.S. for recycling plastic bags, films and wraps. It also operates the world’s largest closed loop plastic bag recycling facility in North Vernon, Indiana. With almost no drop-off sites in the western U.S., other drop-off locations are listed at http://bit.ly/VRRh0i.
  • You can get recycle used motor oil and get 40 cents per gallon back. For a location near you, check CalRecycle’s website. Phone ahead to make sure they participate in the program.
  • Mattresses are becoming accepted for recycling in some communities. Check with your local Transfer Station to see if they have this program
  • More communities have launched residential and commercial food waste recycling

    More communities have launched residential and commercial food waste recycling

    A growing number of communities across the U.S. have begun to accept food scraps as part of their curbside recycling – both residential and commercially. Check with your city to see if this in effect in your area.

  • A wide variety of construction debris is accepted for recycling. Check the C&D Debris Recyclers Database on calRecycle’s website for drop-off or collection sites at http://bit.ly/UixAPT.

The list of recyclables keeps growing. Check CalRecycle’s website regularly for resources and new additions.

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