A view of hope for our ocean and our planet – Cousteau’s Mission 31

Fabien Cousteau, the grandson of famed underwater explorer Jacques Cousteau, lived and worked underwater for 31 consecutive days during the project now called Mission 31. This project was a rare opportunity for scientists to become part of the world under our oceans and expand our knowledge of its issues and grandeur.

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A clear case to support the banning of gill nets for commercial fishing

Just came across this video about the emptying of marine life from the Sea of Cortez between mainland Mexico and the Baja California Peninsula. It’s a clear indictment against the serious damage that commercial overfishing and the use of gill nets have done to what once was a remarkable paradise for hundreds of types of fish and marine life.

The consequences of blatant of human destruction are clear. Watch the video. It not only shows what’s been done but offers some hope with the conservation efforts taking place. To have the locals get behind these efforts is pretty special. One van hope that these efforts will payoff – for the people who depend on fishing for their livelihood and for the Sea of Cortez to be able to return to its aquatic splendor.

Saving ancient redwoods – this “impossible” idea is now a worldwide success

David Milarch, founder of Archangel Ancient Tree Archive project

David Milarch, founder of Archangel Ancient Tree Archive project

Drought has become a serious threat for many countries across the globe. With it, one of the serious repercussions can be seen in Nature and the death of many of our forests through extreme heat and insects that bore into the heart of the trees. Centuries-old forests are dying across the U.S.

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Let’s use explosives and bombs to keep whales out of oil spills

whalesThis story hit the headlines today and had this writer’s jaw drop. It surely falls under the heading of “What the heck are are they thinking!!”

In today’s The Globe and Mail:

“The proponents of two controversial pipelines to British Columbia’s coast say they would consider deploying underwater firecrackers, helicopters and clanging pipes, among other methods, to ensure whales don’t swim toward any disastrous oil spill that might result from increased tanker traffic carrying bitumen to Asia.”

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Canadian organization argues for euthanization of oiled wildlife after oil spills

An oiled Canadian goose, photo courtesy of the U.S. EPA

An oiled Canadian goose, photo courtesy of the U.S. EPA

As yet another example of how out of touch we are with Nature and the vital role of  its creatures, now there’s a controversy as to whether “Canadian governments, industry and wildlife management groups” should work to save wildlife seriously effected after an oil spill or make the “tough” choice to euthanize these creatures.

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The remarkable postive impact of wolves on Yellowstone

Wolves prove elusive to hunters

Animal Planet has backed down, bowing to public outcry that it remove its ‘Man-Eating Super Wolves’ from the air. This kind of film was a ratings grabbing scheme and posed serious negative p.r. on wolves, which are already facing tremendous pressure and death after being stripped of federal protection. Under the guise of “animal protection”, many western states are sanctioning wolf hunts and encouraging torturous treatment of these magnificent creatures.

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Quebec’s new “Living Wall” blends recycled materials and Nature indoors

Living garden quebec - The Currrents 1Living green walls are one of the most special methods that designers and architects have to bring Nature indoors for our enjoyment. They add beauty while helping to keep the air we breathe clean and fresh.

A few years ago I wrote about the amazing living green wall in Singapore’s Changi Airport, which stood at 45 feet tall. But a there’s a new claim to the title “World’s Tallest Living Wall”. Standing at 213 feet tall, this new installation called The Currents is housed in the Desjardins building in Lévis, Quebec. Continue reading

Edible flowers – a colorful way to expand your healthy diet

Bright colored nasturtiums are great additions to summer salads

Bright colored nasturtiums are great additions to summer salads

If you’re a backyard gardener like I am, you’re always looking for something different to try each year. While I always seek new varieties of organic veggies to plant, flowers are steadily making their way into and around the gardens too. With a rule of only growing what I’ll eat, I discovered an interesting article about edible flowers you can cultivate and ways to enjoy eating them Here are a few ideas to brighten up your garden while adding variety to your diet.

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Man-made nesting boxes help local wood ducks thrive in northern California

Colorful wood ducks have come back from the brink of extinction thanks to our help photo by Dawn Beattie, flickr

Colorful wood ducks have come back from the brink of extinction thanks to our help. photo by Dawn Beattie, flickr

Throughout the local waterways of northern California – from the ACID canal to the Sacramento River – you’ll see ducks. North American Wood Ducks to be exact.

The only North American waterfowl that breed twice in the same season. over the years these colorful birds have faced hard times. With over hunting and loss of habitat, they came close to extinction in the early 20th century. An act of Congress – the Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918, which ended unregulated hunting – and a 1937 program by the U.S. Biological Survey (now the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service) to build artificial nesting structures have helped spur them to a dramatic recovery.

To learn more about these fascinating and colorful birds – with unique habits in the bird world – see http://bit.ly/ObeKd5..

Gorgeous wilderness area – first to be designated by Congress in five years

Photo by xray10, flickr

Photo by xray10, flickr

Who knew there were sand dunes in Michigan?  And such beautiful wilderness!

This week Congress passed and sent to President Obama for his signature the Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore Conservation and Recreation Act, which permanently protects 32,557 acres along the mainland shore of Lake Michigan. This newest addition to the National Wilderness Preservation System will be known as “Sleeping Bear Dunes Wilderness,” which includes portions of two islands, forests, miles of beach and spectacular sand dunes rising hundreds of feet above Lake Michigan.

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