The Fire Blanket can stop small household fires

Kovenex Fire Blankets can help put out small household fires - even grease-based fires.

Close to 75,000 household fires occur in the U.S. every year, causing thousands of deaths, injuries and over $7 billion in property loss, according to the U.S. Fire Administration. Kitchen and cooking-related fires account for 44 percent of these.

Many homes have fire extinguishers tucked in a corner or near a wall — “just in case.” But in an emergency, can you operate it quickly? And if it’s out-of-date, it could be almost inoperable to fight a small house fire.

One of the tools used by first responders and firefighters is a fire blanket.

To learn more on how this simple, affordable tool can be your second best firefighting tool at home or work, go to http://bit.ly/yDfZCX.

New airport x-ray machines could pose cancer risk

Thirteen years ago, a panel of radiation safety experts convened by the Food and Drug Administration gathered at a hotel in Maryland to test a new device – the Secure 1000 – that could detect hidden weapons and contraband by beaming X-rays at people to see beneath their clothing.

The experts agreed this device shouldn’t be in general use as it violated the longstanding principle in radiation safety that humans shouldn’t be X-rayed unless there is a medical benefit. The machine’s inventor assured the group that since only 20 machines were currently in use, it probably wouldn’t see widespread use anytime soon.

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Two companies caught by EPA trying to export hazardous discarded electronics to Vietnam

Two recycling companies were caught by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency trying to illegally export e-waste to Vietnam.

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Making (green) Buildings Safe for Firefighters

Green buildings may present special challenges for firefighters because of new technologies, building materials, and building techniques. That’s the concern Fire Safety and Green Buildings—Bridging the Gap, a new website developed by the National Association of State Fire Marshals (NASFM); a handbook on the topic has also been released. 

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Cosmetics may soon be safer

Most consumers don't know what chemicals are in their cosmetics

Lisa Archer, national coordinator for The Campaign for Safe Cosmetics, personal care products contain more than 12,500 chemicals but most consumers don’t know which ones are safe.

That may be about to change.

Three Congressional Representatives – Jan Schakowsky, D-Illinois, Ed Markey, D-Massachusetts, and Tammy Baldwin, D-Wisconsin – have introduced a bill to reform the current outdated law n the use of ingredients in personal care products including cosmetics.

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Retailers set to limit lead in handbags

The health hazards from hidden lead in handbags will soon be limited

 

Most consumers don’t know that there are no standard limits to the amount of lead in purses, handbags, footwear and other accessories. 

Those little metal fasteners, brackets and tacks are almost invisible to consumers and fashionistas, yet they pose real health hazards to pregnant women and women of child-bearing age. 

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FAA suspends JFK's errant air traffic controllers

JetBlueAuthroities have suspended an air traffic controller and a supervisor at JFK after the controller allowed his son to direct several pilots from the control tower.

“This lapse in judgment not only violated FAA’s own policies, but common-sense standards for professional conduct. These kinds of distractions are totally unacceptable,” FAA Administrator Randy Babbitt said in a statement. 

The air traffic controller allowed his son to read some routine instructions to pilots, then brought another child to work the next day.

Pilots seemed amused and pleased. “I wish I could bring my kid to work,” one of them said.

All this was brought to light when a recording of the radio calls was posted on the internet, then reported by a Boston television station. Such transmissions are routinely streamed live on the internet. One user of the popular site LiveATC.net, which is devoted to air controller talk, posted the recording not long after it occurred on February 16th, when New York schoolchildren were on winter break.

According to the recording, the boy made five transmissions to pilots readying for departure.

Control towers are generally highly secure areas, though the agency sometimes gives employees permission to bring their children for a tour.

Dave Pascoe, founder of LiveATC and a pilot and radio enthusiast, said he was sickened at the thought that the controller could be disciplined.

“I believe that this is being blown out of proportion,” he said. “This is just a completely controlled situation. A child was being told exactly what to say.”

He added: “I think it’s just fantastic that this guy cared enough to take his kid to work. How many parents take their kids to work these days?”

Is this a case of the FAA coming down hard to avoid a media frenzy? What do you readers think?

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