A Spray-on Solar Cell?

A team from the University of South Florida has succeeded in creating the world’s tiniest solar photovoltaic cell, made of organic material.

Each solar cell is a quarter size of a grain of rice and can be dissolved into a solution that can then be sprayed onto a variety of surfaces – including clothing, cars, homes – as they’re exposed to sunlight.

A special spray gun would need to be designed to control the thickness and size of the spray.

So far, scientists have been able to generate 11 volts of electricity from a small “array” of cells, said Xiaomei Jiang, the lead researcher.

 

"Cool" can Help Reduce Greenhouse Gas

Cool 2012 – founded by the Grassroots Recycling Network (GRRN), a network of recycling professionals and activists committed to creating zero waste – is working to dramatically reduce greenhouse gases by being cool – removing Computable Organics Out of Landfills.

By helping to prevent methane in landfills and supporting sustainable agricultural practices, this national initiative has a three-pronged approach.

As paper comprises the largest portion of biodegradable material in landfills, Cool 2012 is committed to recycling at least 75% of all paper and composting the rest.

Separation of compostables, recyclables and residuals from business and residential waste is necessarily crucial to effectively reduce landfill waste.

Composting is a fast-growing movement. Community composting supports local farmers and sustainable food production. Adding organic compostables to soil adds vital nutrients, creating rich soil and healthier food. Amending soil helps reduce irrigation needs, decreases petroleum-based fertilizer use and increases water absorption.

Adopting Cool 2012

www.cool2012.com/cool would be an excellent step for communities to implement as they focus on increasing their sustainability practices.

“Cool” can Help Reduce Greenhouse Gas

Cool 2012 – founded by the Grassroots Recycling Network (GRRN), a network of recycling professionals and activists committed to creating zero waste – is working to dramatically reduce greenhouse gases by being cool – removing Computable Organics Out of Landfills.

By helping to prevent methane in landfills and supporting sustainable agricultural practices, this national initiative has a three-pronged approach.

As paper comprises the largest portion of biodegradable material in landfills, Cool 2012 is committed to recycling at least 75% of all paper and composting the rest.

Separation of compostables, recyclables and residuals from business and residential waste is necessarily crucial to effectively reduce landfill waste.

Composting is a fast-growing movement. Community composting supports local farmers and sustainable food production. Adding organic compostables to soil adds vital nutrients, creating rich soil and healthier food. Amending soil helps reduce irrigation needs, decreases petroleum-based fertilizer use and increases water absorption.

Adopting Cool 2012

www.cool2012.com/cool would be an excellent step for communities to implement as they focus on increasing their sustainability practices.