A great way to understand the issues surrounding glyphosate

Glyphosate graphic

Glyphosate is all over the news. The World Health Organization declared it a likely carcinogen yet the U.S. EPA continues to drag its feet adding it to the list of chemicals banned for use.

For those who don’t know or aren’t sure, glyphosate is the key ingredient in Monsanto’s Roundup herbicide. It’s also found in 750 or more other products in the U.S. Tests have shown that people in 18 countries across Europe have glyphosate in their bodies. Another study revealed that the chemical has estrogenic properties and drives breast cancer proliferation in the parts-per-trillion range. And in February 2012, a shocking study published by the journal Archives of Toxicology showed that Roundup is toxic to human DNA even when diluted to concentrations 450-fold lower than used in agricultural applications.

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Toxic pesticide turning up everywhere we don’t want it

Consumers should be concerned that the toxic chemical glyphosate, shown here being sprayed on crops, is being found in places we really don't want it to be

Consumers should be concerned that the toxic chemical glyphosate, shown here being sprayed on crops, is being found in places we really don’t want it to be

The push to get glyphosate – – a key ingredient in Monsanto’s cash cow RoundUp – banned by the U.S. EPA as a highly toxic pesticide continues. Even more of a concern to consumers is the fact that traces of glyphosate are showing up in a lot of things Americans use every day.

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How composting can make a difference in the face of climate change

Compost, photo courtesy of Recology

Photo courtesy of Recology

The world’s soil has lost up to 80 percent of its carbon – runaway fossil fuel use, rampant deforestation and modern industrial agricultural practices that depend on widespread pesticide use are responsible for that.

That carbon, now CO2 in our atmosphere, is growing at an alarming rate. Governments are beginning to recognize that climate change due to increased greenhouse gases in our atmosphere is a reality.

To learn what Recology, a San Francisco Bay area composting facility, is doing about this and the international attention its innovative methods have attracted, click here to read the full article.

UK farmers may only have 100 more harvests unless they improve their soil

Poor soil quality could mean only 100 more harvests in the UK

Poor soil quality could mean only 100 more harvests in the UK

The idea of food scarcity just got a little more real in the United Kingdom. New research released by The Soil Association states that with continued soil loss and degradation, farmers in the UK may only have 100 more harvests left.

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Hellmann’s announces 2 new non-GMO products

 

Hellmann's new non-GMO mayonaise

Score another one for consumers Another large food manufacturer is paying attention to what we want.

Hellman’s parent company Unilever announced today it was adding 2 new non-GMO products to its line. They are Hellmann’s Organic Mayonaise and Hellmann’s “Carefully Crafted” egg-free dressing and sandwich spread. This comes after the introduction of Hellmann’s non-GMO olive oil mayonnaise last year.

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FDA bans genetically engineered salmon – for now that is

 

The difference between “regular” salmon and larger, genetically engineered “Frankenfish” is apparent

Just two months after the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved genetically engineered salmon for human consumption, it appears that it’s taken a step backward – though perhaps this is actually a step forward for consumers. This past Friday, the FDA issued a ban on the import and sale of  AquAdvantage salmon, produced by Massachusetts-based AquaBounty, until the agency can publish guidelines for how it should be labeled.

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