Johnson & Johnson and partners will work to create an HIV Vaccine

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Today is #WorldAIDSDay, a day when the world’s focus is on  the fight against HIV/AIDS.

There are already a number of medications on the market to help ease symptoms of HIV.According to the World Health Organization, since the HIV/AIDS epidemic began more than 30 years ago, over 70 million people have contracted HIV.  No vaccine exists to help prevent this life-threatening disease. But there’s hope on this front.

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Roundup without Glyphosate? They have it, just not in the U.S.

Roundup and Monsanto have been taking some pretty hard hits from environmentalists, farmers, scientists and others because of the highly toxic main ingredient glyphosate. Even though the EPA, now being strong-armed by our current administration, never finalized its findings about the chemical’s toxicity, there’s plenty of evidence around the world that this is a seriously bad thing for the environment.

But there may be a small ray of hope out there.

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New York City’s Lowline striding forward to becoming reality

The Lowline - a former trolley area that will be transformed into a unique underground park

The Lowline – a former trolley area that will be transformed into a unique underground park

New York City is famous for many things – Radio City Music Hall, the Statue of Liberty and, for those in the know, the High Line. This last is an above-ground park on the city’s West side that stretches from its original 14th to 20th Streets now extends to 30th Street.

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This year’s best and worst “Green” cities

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As consumers demand more green – in their products, building materials and in sustainability of companies they deal with, cities in the U.S. are ramping up their efforts to accommodate.

According to the Pew Research Center, 74 percent of Americans support efforts to protect the environment. To honor this National Energy Awareness Month, the personal-finance website conducted an in-depth analysis of 2016’s Greenest Cities in America. The website’s analysts compared the 100 largest cities across 20 key “green” indicators. These ranged from “greenhouse-gas emissions per capita” to “number of smart-energy policies and initiatives.”

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California dairy to be first to sell non-GMO certified conventional milk

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There’s a lot of milk out there. And if you look carefully at the labels, you may discover that what you don’t see could be a problem. Truth is, the majority of conventional milk comes from cows that are given rBST and/or rGBH, artificial growth hormones that have been in the news a lot.

But one northern California dairy is stepping outside the norm to provide what they feel is a healthier line of milk products.

Clover Stornetta Farms, a Petaluma, California-based dairy, is betting that consumers will go for their conventional milk that isn’t organic but is healthier. They plan to replace their conventional milk with one produced without GMOs in the supply line. Continue reading

Modified wood product aims to save hardwood forests from the axe

 

Australia's famed hardwood tree - the Eucalyptus obliqua - could be spared in favor of 3Wood

Australia’s famed hardwood tree – the Eucalyptus obliqua – could be spared in favor of 3Wood

Waste is a terrible thing, particularly when it comes to the use of hardwood trees. The World Wildlife Fund says that about 46-58 thousand square miles of forest are lost each year. That’s a huge amount of carbon released into the atmosphere from deforestation.

David Lewis, Australia’s Flinders Centre for NanoScale Science & Technology (CNST) Director and co-developer,  says “if you take a big tree, only a small percentage of that becomes hardwood; the rest is chipped and burned.”

But there’s hope on the horizon.

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Help innovators save our oldest champion trees

Archangel-Ancient-Tree-Archive 1The world has lost over 90 percent of its old growth forests. And we’ve lost 95 percent of our magnificent redwoods. Those that remain are threatened by logging and climate change-related insect epidemics.

While a number of organizations and NGOs are working on reforestation projects around the globe, one group has been striving to save the remaining “champion” ancient trees and their genetics for future generations to appreciate.

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