26 Puget Sound (Washington) cities to plant cloned Coastal Redwood trees

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Trees are vital to life. They provide oxygen, store huge amounts of carbon and provide critical habitat and food for wildlife. Yet the world’s forests are dying. In California alone, over 100 million of them have died due to climate change related factors, to say nothing of the scourge of clear cutting that’s decimating our forest land.

But there are rays of hope.

In Washington state, twenty-six Puget Sound cities are planting sapling clones of Coast Redwoods – among the oldest, largest, most iconic trees on earth.

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New partnership aims to reverse deforestation and global warming

One of California's giant coastal redwoods that's been cloned to save its genetic diversity, photo by Debra Atlas

One of California’s giant coastal redwoods that’s been cloned to save its genetic diversity, photo by Debra Atlas

On May 28th, two powerful entities came together to take on two serious climate-related issues and make a positive impact on our children’s future.

Planetary Emissions Management, Inc. and non-profit Archangel Ancient Tree Archive announced a partnership that will integrate innovative forest carbon measurement with environmental financial products along with the genetics of the largest trees on the planet.

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Help innovators save our oldest champion trees

Archangel-Ancient-Tree-Archive 1The world has lost over 90 percent of its old growth forests. And we’ve lost 95 percent of our magnificent redwoods. Those that remain are threatened by logging and climate change-related insect epidemics.

While a number of organizations and NGOs are working on reforestation projects around the globe, one group has been striving to save the remaining “champion” ancient trees and their genetics for future generations to appreciate.

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2,000 year old Florida cypress tree to be cloned

Lady Liberty 2000 yr old Florida Cypress treeThe world has lost over 90 percent of its forests. We’re feeling the impact of this with increasing weather “events”.

One non-profit organization has been stepping up to help turn the tide by cloning and preserving some of our oldest and largest champion trees. And the latest example is Lady Liberty, a 2,000 year old bald cypress tree in Florida.

Archangel Ancient Tree Archive, an organization we’ve written much about over the past few years, has plans to scale this magnificent 89 foot tall tree sometime today and collect samples and genetic material so that they can clone and preserve it as part of their genetic living library of trees. Continue reading

Documentary on Reforesting the planet to save it a finalist at Banff

David Milarch - Bill Werner at  at Sequoia Crest CA, photo by Bill Latka Rivet Entertainment, owned by Archangel

Champion tree at Sequoia Crest, California, photo-by Bill Latka Rivet Entertainment, owned by Archangel

You may remember the name David Milarch. He’s the founder of Archangel Ancient Tree Archive, the organization that gathers genetic material from “champion trees” to create exact clones that will preserve these very special trees and help reforest our planet. David and Archangel have been written about and filmed by a number of entities around the world for the important work they’re doing.

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Champion Coast Redwood Cloned Trees Available for Rehoming

One of California's giant coastal redwoods  that's been cloned to save its genetic diversity, photo by Debra Atlas

One of northern California’s giant coastal redwoods that’s been cloned to save its genetic diversity, photo by Debra Atlas

As the drought continues, with little sign of breaking, wildfires are claiming much of our beautiful forested land. And these trees will need replacing, whether by the Forest Service or by landowners on private land.

Those of you familiar with earlier posts know about the Archangel Ancient Tree Project and David Milarch, its irrepressible co-founder. For those of you who don’t, Milarch has made it his life mission to save and clone the oldest giant “Champion” trees so that their genetic diversity will be saved for posterity and use these clones to help reforest countries around the world. Having recently met Milarch and having the chance to see some of these tall giants still alive was a fantastic experience. There will definitely be more to write about what I saw and learned over the coming months!

For right now, Archangel Ancient Tree Archive​, a registered non-profit based in Michigan, has a unique opportunity available for those who need to replace burned out trees – or those who wish to expand existing forest land. Milarch’s organization currently has quantities of ​2nd generation Champion coast redwood clones available for planting groves in appropriate areas in “living libraries” to assist ​with migration of the species. These are the largest living organisms on earth and they help offset CO2 emissions​ ​while providing a multitude of other essential ecosystem services.

Milarch says they have approximately 10,000 trees available for those who can use and will care for them. To learn more about these magnificent trees and see how to get them for your property, contact Milarch at (231) 378-4400 or online.

Conservation group planting cloned ancient trees today

Archangel-Ancient-Tree-Archive 1Forests used to cover a large majority of land across the globe hundreds of years ago. Today forests cover just 31 percent of the world’s land surface. Deforestation due to logging, for agriculture and pastures as well as harvesting wood for fuel and industrial use have taken a heavy toll, wiping out critical wildlife habitat and releasing stored carbon into the atmosphere.

David Milarch, co-founder of Archangel Ancient Tree Archive, has been striving to help save some of our most ancient treasures – some of the oldest trees still in existence in the world. For the past two decades, Milarch and his two sons have raced against time, snipping branches and seedlings from the world’s biggest and most durable trees and have created clones of them in hopes of restoring ancient forests and helping to fight climate change.

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