26 Puget Sound (Washington) cities to plant cloned Coastal Redwood trees

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Trees are vital to life. They provide oxygen, store huge amounts of carbon and provide critical habitat and food for wildlife. Yet the world’s forests are dying. In California alone, over 100 million of them have died due to climate change related factors, to say nothing of the scourge of clear cutting that’s decimating our forest land.

But there are rays of hope.

In Washington state, twenty-six Puget Sound cities are planting sapling clones of Coast Redwoods – among the oldest, largest, most iconic trees on earth.

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Now that the election’s over, how will we respond?

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For many, the election of Donald Trump as the 45th President is nothing less than a travesty, evoking fear, dread and deep concerns. For others, it’s a time of celebration and hope for stability, strong values.

Whichever camp you fall in, the question is what will we do now?

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How a new source of water is helping reduce conflict in the Middle East

Editor:   The following is an excerpt of an article by Rowan Jacobsen. It offers an intriguing idea and opportunity that not only could help bring water to countries (and villages) parched by continuing drought but also help resolve conflicts between warring nations.

Scientists and others look to desalination as a way to unite longtime enemies in a common cause.

Israel's Sorek Desalination Plant - an opportunity for water and easing conflicts

Israel’s Sorek Desalination Plant – an opportunity for water and easing conflicts

Ten miles south of Tel Aviv, I stand on a catwalk over two concrete reservoirs the size of football fields and watch water pour into them from a massive pipe emerging from the sand. The pipe is so large I could walk through it standing upright, were it not full of Mediterranean seawater pumped from an intake a mile offshore.

“Now, that’s a pump!” Edo Bar-Zeev shouts to me over the din of the motors, grinning with undisguised awe at the scene before us. The reservoirs beneath us contain several feet of sand through which the seawater filters before making its way to a vast metal hangar, where it is transformed into enough drinking water to supply 1.5 million people.

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Why Australia’s loss of 7,000 hectares of mangroves will have serious consequences

Dead mangrove forest off Australia's east coast, photo by James Cook University

Dead mangrove forest off Australia’s east coast, photo by James Cook University

Climate change has wrecked havoc not only on our weather patterns but on the world’s forest and ecological systems. And the impact is devastating.

In the U.S., severe drought and major insect infestations have been responsible for almost unimaginable die-offs of old growth forests. In Australia El Nino conditions have caused the die-off of a 7000 kilometer (approximately 4,349 miles) stretch of mangrove shoreline in the southern reaches of the Gulf of Carpentaria.

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New partnership aims to reverse deforestation and global warming

One of California's giant coastal redwoods that's been cloned to save its genetic diversity, photo by Debra Atlas

One of California’s giant coastal redwoods that’s been cloned to save its genetic diversity, photo by Debra Atlas

On May 28th, two powerful entities came together to take on two serious climate-related issues and make a positive impact on our children’s future.

Planetary Emissions Management, Inc. and non-profit Archangel Ancient Tree Archive announced a partnership that will integrate innovative forest carbon measurement with environmental financial products along with the genetics of the largest trees on the planet.

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How composting can make a difference in the face of climate change

Compost, photo courtesy of Recology

Photo courtesy of Recology

The world’s soil has lost up to 80 percent of its carbon – runaway fossil fuel use, rampant deforestation and modern industrial agricultural practices that depend on widespread pesticide use are responsible for that.

That carbon, now CO2 in our atmosphere, is growing at an alarming rate. Governments are beginning to recognize that climate change due to increased greenhouse gases in our atmosphere is a reality.

To learn what Recology, a San Francisco Bay area composting facility, is doing about this and the international attention its innovative methods have attracted, click here to read the full article.

UK farmers may only have 100 more harvests unless they improve their soil

Poor soil quality could mean only 100 more harvests in the UK

Poor soil quality could mean only 100 more harvests in the UK

The idea of food scarcity just got a little more real in the United Kingdom. New research released by The Soil Association states that with continued soil loss and degradation, farmers in the UK may only have 100 more harvests left.

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