Instant-Off – a simple way to save water

Instant-Off will eliminate dripping water and reduce your water usage

With the world’s population is increasing and indications showing a growth rate between 40 to 50 percent within the next 50 years, the demand for water won’t be able to keep up.

Concerns about food security in the face of climate change and retreating water sources has turned water into a precious commodity. Wasting water is a luxury we can’t afford.

Better water efficiency is what Instant-Off is all about.

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Film Company Brings Green Projects to the Screen

Movies can lift our spirits pull at our emotions.

The short films Green Living Project produces are “an opportunity to motivate and inspire … (and) to influence,” said Rob Holmes, GLP’s Founder and President.

Since its beginnings in 2007, GLP has produced 65 short films in 17 countries that are intended to educate and inspire people about sustainability programs, eco-tourism, wildlife conservation, community development and education.

To learn more about the films premiered and the educational opportunities available through Green Living Project, go to http://bit.ly/tbgx0B.

New dolphin species identified off Australia

Australian researcher identifies this new species of dolphin

Dolphins are for many a creature filled with mystery and a bit of whimsy. Whether you remember the now iconic Flipper or have actually had the thrill of swimming with dolphins, these highly intelligent marine mammals evoke a heart-felt response that’s part wonder and part joy.

An Australian researcher has successfully identified a new species of dolphin that makes its home off the coast of Australia.

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School kids create art with recycled bottle caps

Elementary school students created this mural from recycled bottle caps

Students at Central Valley Elementary School in upstate New York have created an eleven-foot by eight-foot butterfly mural made with colored recycled plastic bottle caps.

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Eco-friendly gift ideas for Christmas

Fiber Active Organics - eco-friendly elegance for the holidays

It wouldn’t be Christmas without bright colored decorations, carols, tantalizing smells and surprises under the tree.

Here are some suggestions for holiday gifts and decoration to create a very special holiday.

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Sustainable agriculture group asks Congress to act on climate change legislation

The National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition joined seventy-six other sustainable agriculture and environmental groups to urge Congress to pass climate change legislation during this current congressional session. 

In a letter delivered today to the US Senate, the Coalition said any climate change and energy legislation “must include measures to increase the use of sustainable and organic farming systems to increase the ability of our nation’s agricultural soils to sequester large amounts of carbon.” These systems would, the group said, improve the soil, lower farmers’ contribution to greenhouse gas levels and help farmers adapt to and survive rapid changes in climate. 

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Greenpeace says Costco’s seafood sustainability efforts miss the mark

Greenpeace is taking aim at Costco, the third largest retailer in the country, for its poor efforts in offering sustainable seafood. 

Costco has repeatedly assured shareholders and customers that it supports sustainable seafood, yet its actions say otherwise. Consumers can easily find 15 of the 22 seafoods ‘red-listed’ by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) which is the world’s leading authority on species in danger of extinction. Costco regularly carries two of the world’s most critically imperiled species: orange roughy and Chilean sea bass.  

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Woodchuck Cider teams with American Forests to plant trees in California

Woodchuck Cider logoOn Earth Day 2010, Woodchuck Cider – a premier maker of handcrafted hard ciders based in Vermont – took an unusual stand. They launched a Facebook Global ReLeaf campaign, saying that by the end of the day, they would donate a tree for every Facebook fan they acquired.

The excitement streamed across social networks with fans cross-promoting the campaign via Twitter. The results were astonishing. Woodchuck had gained 8,432 fans.

Today Woodchuck announced they would plant that many trees as part of the ReLeaf program, American Forests tree planting arm. Global ReLeaf is the oldest nonprofit conservation organization in the U.S.  This year Global ReLeaf plans to plant 4.8 million trees as part of 43 projects in 14 states and 10 countries that will work to restore forests critical for endangered wildlife, clean water, and carbon Global Releaf Logosequestration.

Woodchuck and Globel ReLeaf chose California to be the recipient of these trees to help rebuild forests devastated  by numerous wildfires tover the past several years.

The tree planting will begin this summer and continue through the rest of the year.

This results of this kind of campaign just shows how amazingly integral social networks have become – and the real potential they pose for making a difference.

Are you eating endangerd tuna?

Sushi 1Seafood tracability is becoming an important factor for consumers, particularly with the steady rise in mercury and other harmful pollutants in our oceans.

Knowing where you fish came from – and how much mercury it contains – has just gotten a little easier.

DNA barcoding research conducted by the Sackler Institute for Comparative Genomics at the American Museum of Natural History has shown that sushi purchased in supermarkets might actually be healthier than that from restaurants, where it’s likely you’ll end up eating endangered species of tuna.

The new research revealed that one-fourth of the tuna served on sushi menus is bluefin, while some was escolar, a waxy, buttery fish often labeled “white tuna” that’s banned for sale in Japan and Italy because it can cause gastrointestinal distress. 

Bluefin tunaNew DNA barcoading allows consumers to know what kind of tuna they’re really getting.

Jacob Lowenstein – a graduate student affiliated with the Museum and Columbia University – and colleagues used DNA barcoding to identify the kind of fishes labeled “tuna” in one Denver and 30 New York City restaurants. Almost half the restaurants did not accurately label the kind of tuna sold, and only 14 of the samples used for this study were listed on the menu by a specific name like bigeye tuna, albacore, or bluefin.

The results of the investigation showed how misled consumers have been when ordering their favorite sushi.

  • The most prevalent tuna found in sushi is bigeye (30, or almost half, of the 68 samples collected for this study). 
  • Nearly a third of the tuna was bluefin.
  • Only eight of the 22 bluefin samples were labeled “bluefin” on menus, and nine restaurants that sold the bluefin didn’t label it as such on the menu, although restaurants that did, did so accurately and charged more for the sushi.
  • Five of the nine samples labeled in restaurants as “white tuna” were not albacore but escola.

“It is very difficult to get reliable information about the species you are eating, especially since the FDA’s approved market name for all eight species of Thunnusis simply ‘tuna’,” says Lowenstein. New requirements that would market each species under its own name would help to clarify cases of economic fraud and allow conservation-minded consumers to avoid bluefin.

Like anychange, it has to start with consumer demand. Speaking up and asking questions are the first steps to really knowing what you eat and how safe it is for you and the environment.

Tetley: 100% Rainforest Certified by 2016

Tetley 1The world’s second largest tea company, Tetley Tea, announced it will source all its tea from Rainforest Alliance certified farms by 2016.

Rainforest AllianceThe Rainforest Alliance currently has 215,000 acres of Rainforest Alliance-certified farms in Kenya, Tanzania, Argentina, India and Indonesia. This New York based non-profit certifies farms around the world that meet the specific environmental, social and economic standards of the Sustainable Agriculture Network. Standards include worker rights and safety, water and soil conservation, wildlife protection, and legal wages.

One of the Tata Beverage Group’s main brands, Tetley sells black, green, red, flavored and decaffeinated teas, and has a presence in 70 countries. Their first certified products will hit the UK foodservice sector this April and Canada by early 2011. Rainforest Alliance Certified Tetley tea will branch out to the United States, Australia and mainland Europe in 2012.