New book shows Humans and Nature are interdependent

What Has Nature Ever Done for Us coverHumans need Nature to survive and thrive. Too often we treat Nature as a commodity, exploiting, polluting and destroying it in our unfailing drive towards “progress”.

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Young people earn “Hero” awards

Gloria-Barron-Prize-for-Young-Heroes

If you’re a child of the 50’s, you’ll remember Ark Linkletter and his famous Kids say the Darndest Things!  Young people see things differently, ideas and possibilities others don’t and take action to make them come alive.

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New shark discovered off Indonesia

New shark 2

A new type of shark has been identified. The new species of epaulette shark called Hemiscyllium halmahera has been seen “walking” along the shallow waters and sea floor off a remote island near Indonesia.

New shark 1

First seen by divers in 2008,  this beautiful shark uses its fins to effectively “walk” along the ocean bottom or coral reefs to forage for food.  A very exciting and important discovery for conservationists. And hopefully one that the Indonesian government can help protect. Check out the video story here.

Unique program helps restore coral reefs off Florida

The Coral Restoration Foundation is helping to restore the reefs off the Florida coast

The Coral Restoration Foundation is helping to restore the reefs off the Florida coast

The coral reefs in our oceans are in trouble. Increasing ocean acidification and pollution are causing serious damage to these once seemingly ageless structures. But with the help of marine scientists at Key Largo’s world-renowned nonprofit Coral Restoration Foundation (CRF) and its coral restoration workshops, divers from around the world are helping transplant nursery corals into an offshore coral nursery.

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Sustainable Singapore balances building and Nature

Singapore's Forest Walk is part of their continuing success to green the island-nation

With a population of over 4.4 million, Singapore is one of the most densely populated cities in the world. Known at various times throughout its history as The Little Red Dot, the Lion City, and the City in the Garden, this tropical island city-state covers less than 300 square miles, over ten percent of which is land reclaimed from the sea.

Juxtaposed to this crowded urban area is also over 2,000 plant varieties, 57 types of mammals, 98 types of reptiles, and 25 varieties of amphibians. Hundreds of bird and butterfly species migrate there each year and one-third of the world’s hard coral reefs are found in its surrounding waters. The natural diversity that is Singapore includes rainforests, freshwater swamp forests, mangrove forests, and coastal forests.

To discover the amazing success of Singapore’s green efforts, see the full article at http://bit.ly/A18uHL.