Green Travel Guides from TripSketch make planning easy

As gas prices take an apparent welcome dip and summer heats up, thoughts turn to summer getaways.  Whether it’s a trip to the coast, visiting family or just hitting the road, road trips take time consuming planning.

TripSketch, a San Francisco Bay area mobile travel and trip planning company, has just launched a suite of nine new mobile “apps” for the iPhone and Android called Regional Green Travel Guides.

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Woodchuck Cider teams with American Forests to plant trees in California

Woodchuck Cider logoOn Earth Day 2010, Woodchuck Cider – a premier maker of handcrafted hard ciders based in Vermont – took an unusual stand. They launched a Facebook Global ReLeaf campaign, saying that by the end of the day, they would donate a tree for every Facebook fan they acquired.

The excitement streamed across social networks with fans cross-promoting the campaign via Twitter. The results were astonishing. Woodchuck had gained 8,432 fans.

Today Woodchuck announced they would plant that many trees as part of the ReLeaf program, American Forests tree planting arm. Global ReLeaf is the oldest nonprofit conservation organization in the U.S.  This year Global ReLeaf plans to plant 4.8 million trees as part of 43 projects in 14 states and 10 countries that will work to restore forests critical for endangered wildlife, clean water, and carbon Global Releaf Logosequestration.

Woodchuck and Globel ReLeaf chose California to be the recipient of these trees to help rebuild forests devastated  by numerous wildfires tover the past several years.

The tree planting will begin this summer and continue through the rest of the year.

This results of this kind of campaign just shows how amazingly integral social networks have become – and the real potential they pose for making a difference.

Nestle to quit buying palm oil linked to deforestation

Nestle logoSeems like the sustainable bandwagon is moving ahead. Contrary to my less than optimistic view when Unilever announced they’d stop buying palm oil from an Indonesian planter involved in deforestation, now Nestle is joining the party.

After a two month campaign by Greenpeace, Nestle announced plans to stop buying palm oil from Sinar Mas Group, an Indonesian lumber and chemical products conglomerate accused by Greenpeace of illegal deforestation practices. Nestle says it has partnered with The Forest Trust, a non-profit organization that works to help companies establish sustainable supply chains.  to “focus on the systematic identification and exclusion of companies owning or managing high risk plantations or farms linked to deforestation.”

Nestle has set a goal of making its palm oil products 100 percent sustainable by 2015.  It’s currently at 18 percent.

Greenpeace’s campaign to “help” Nestle shift their palm oil practices included spurring consumers to take action with over 200,000 sent e-mail messages, hundreds of phone calls and countless Facebook comments.

So I’m a bit more optimistic this time around with another corporate giant making noises and taking action towards creating a sustainable supply chain. Who’ll be next to jump on this bandwagon?