The Growing Trend of Zero Food Waste and U.S. companies

Food waste

We’ve become a throwaway society. Leftovers from a dinner out get tossed into the trash. Bruised or past due supermarket produce winds up in dumpsters and ultimately in our landfills.

There’s a growing movement to give “organics” a second life. The Zero Waste movement has taken on food waste and businesses and organizations are embracing this sustainability trend.

Here are some sobering facts about food waste:

  • Approximately 40 percent of our food supply is wasted. That’s more than 20 pounds of food per person per month – the equivalent of $115 billion per year!
  • Organic waste is the second highest component of landfills, the largest source of methane emissions.

Food waste is a large and growing problem. To learn more about the zero waste movement and some of the innovative companies that have embraced it, click here.

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Soaking Up Soil Conservation: Saving Water In The Face Of Drought

photo courtesy of normanack

photo courtesy of normanack

Water availability with the continuing drought has become a global issue.

Research shows that one of the easiest ways to nurture land, help the environment and have the land retain water is soil conservation through composting – turning food waste and yard scraps into usable garden soil that’s then applied to various landscapes.

To learn more about compost’s remarkable ability to save tens of thousands of gallons of water and help alleviate the drought, click here.

Keep produce fresh longer with Debbie Meyer Green Bags

Debbie Meyer Green Bags can really help you cut food waste

Debbie Meyer Green Bags can really help you cut food waste

Keeping with our newest and growing tradition, Americans throw out a good 25 percent of the produce we buy. Whether it’s overripe bananas or unattractive scuzzy lettuce, the result is unappetizing looking food you don’t want to touch, much less eat.

You’ve seen the TV commercials about this simple innovative solution. It’s not my usual new-to-market type, but it’s definitely one that works.

Debbie Meyer Green Bags™ are plastic bags that absorb and remove ethylene, the main culprit that causes produce to go bad. These bags contain zeolite, an aluminum silicate mineral that absorbs gases like CO2 and helps control the humidity that surrounds your produce.

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CropMobster helps local farmers eliminate food waste

Cropmobster produce gleaning  with Petaluma Bounty, photo by Gary Cedar, courtesy of CropMobster

Cropmobster produce harvesting with Petaluma Bounty, photo by Gary Cedar, courtesy of CropMobster

It’s almost unthinkable but more than fifty percent of the fresh produce grown in the U.S. goes uneaten. Continue reading

Curbside Food Waste Collection – A Growing Trend

Composting food waste scraps can help reduce greenhouse gas emissions

Composting food waste scraps can help reduce greenhouse gas emissions

Almost half of the nearly 250 million tons of garbage that winds up in landfills in the U.S. each year could be composted. An average single-family household throws away about 45 pounds of food scraps and food-soiled paper every month—around 25% of total trashed materials! Sierra Club Green Home explores a growing trend that creates a viable alternative to this: curbside food waste collection.

Already over 160 communities in 16 states have implemented curbside food waste collection programs. For more on this growing trend and the important environmental impact that it has, see http://bit.ly/Xy0gS1.

This is the first of a short series on the importance and impact of composting. Come back soon for Part 2.

EcoScraps – real organic garden products

EcoScraps garden products are made from fruit and veggie waste

EcoScraps garden products are made from fruit and veggie waste

Very likely you haven’t thought about feeding your trees since it’s the middle of winter. But now’s the time to start thinking about it.

February is a good time to fertilize your trees, said Pam Eagelston of Gold Leaf Nursery.

“Feeding the soil is as important as fertilizing the tree,” she said. “It feeds the beneficial microorganisms in the soil, improves the texture of the soil and helps dissolve the nutrients to a form that the roots can absorb.”

If you don’t want to use chemicals this year, there’s an effective organic option.

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