Citrus Greening Solutions – Research Fuels Creative Options for Detection, Prevention

Editors Note:  We’re back! It’s been a few months since last I posted – and for good reason. I’ve been knee-deep (pen / computer deep doesn’t sound right) in working on my 1st book. More on that at a future date. Although I’m currently in rewrites, you can expect to see a bit more from me here. And hopefully you’ll let me know how you like what you read! So onwards!

Citrus Greening is devastating the citrus industry. Photo courtesy of USDA, Flickr

$3.3 billion. That’s what the National Agricultural Statistics Service rates the value of the citrus industry in the United States. Yet danger and some of the industry’s greatest challenges lurk in citrus groves across the country – devastating pests and diseases.

The Department of Homeland Security estimates invasive species annually cause $136 billion in overall lost agricultural revenue in the U.S.

The Asian Citrus Psyllid, which creates a disease-causing bacteria known as Huanglongbing (HLB) or citrus greening, is one of the citrus industry’s most destructive insects. It has infected commercial and residential citrus trees across the country from Florida to Texas to California. The disease clogs an infected tree’s vascular system, preventing fruit from maturing and eventually killing the tree.

To learn more about what’s being done to combat this devastating disease – including some innovative projects that are showing great promise – check out the full article here.

Genetically engineered mosquitoes could create another mosquito population disaster

mosquito-that-carries-zika

Too often science makes a so-called breakthrough and we jump on its results. But also too often, we blindly leap, never considering the potential issues of the larger picture.

And here we are again.

In an article in yesterday’s Sustainable Pulse, genetic engineering company Oxitec, the company clamoring to release GE mosquitoes to deal with the Zika problem, admitted that reducing one mosquito species could likely lead to a population explosion of the Asian Tiger Mosquito.

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Oregon’s governor signs ban on GMO canola growth in Willamette Valley

Canola-north-plains OregonGovernor John Kitzhaber (D-OR) signed into law a bill that banned the growth of genetically modified canola (rapeseed) for commercial production on Thursday, August 15th.  The new law prohibits growing the GMO crop within the three million acre Willamette Valley Protected District, one of the world’s pre-eminent vegetable seed producing regions, until 2019.

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Tsumani debris may strike the West Coast for years

This massive dock that landed in Oregon is the likely the tip of the debris maelstrom to hit the West Coast for years to come

Seven feet tall, nineteen feet wide and 66 feet long, the concrete and metal dock that washed ashore in Newport, Oregon is a stunning residual remnant of last year’s Fukushima disaster. An awesome sight, the derelict dock that made the more than 6,500 mile trek from Minamisoma, Japan is a harbinger of serious debris yet to come.

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