Hellmann’s announces 2 new non-GMO products

 

Hellmann's new non-GMO mayonaise

Score another one for consumers Another large food manufacturer is paying attention to what we want.

Hellman’s parent company Unilever announced today it was adding 2 new non-GMO products to its line. They are Hellmann’s Organic Mayonaise and Hellmann’s “Carefully Crafted” egg-free dressing and sandwich spread. This comes after the introduction of Hellmann’s non-GMO olive oil mayonnaise last year.

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Breyers says no to using milk with artificial growth hormone

Breyers Ice CreamIn a stunning announcement, Breyer’s, the mega-giant ice cream company, says it will stop using milk from cows treated with the controversial hormone rBST. The artificial growth hormone, which stands for recombinant bovine somatotropin, is a genetically engineered hormone that farmers inject into cows to increase milk production. It’s been linked to a number of serious health problems in cows, and in humans who drink the cows’ milk.

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Unilever partners with Carrotmob to generate better sustainability with consumers

The saying “consumers vote with their dollars” is truer than ever these days. Manufacturers pay a great deal of attention to how and where consumers spend their hard-earned money and fine tune their products and marketing campaigns to meet their needs.

Unilever – a global consumer goods manufacturer – is deeply aware of this and recently partnered with non-profit Carrotmob to create sustainability campaigns that will attract green-minded consumers.

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Ben and Jerry’s – ice cream’s no longer “all natural” thanks to Unilever

Ben and Jerry's - no longer "natural"

Since Anglo-Dutch conglomerate Unilever bought out Ben and Jerry’s in 2000, though there was lip service about no changes being made was given for the sake of long-standing customers, such sadly has proven to be just that – lip service. 

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Nestle to quit buying palm oil linked to deforestation

Nestle logoSeems like the sustainable bandwagon is moving ahead. Contrary to my less than optimistic view when Unilever announced they’d stop buying palm oil from an Indonesian planter involved in deforestation, now Nestle is joining the party.

After a two month campaign by Greenpeace, Nestle announced plans to stop buying palm oil from Sinar Mas Group, an Indonesian lumber and chemical products conglomerate accused by Greenpeace of illegal deforestation practices. Nestle says it has partnered with The Forest Trust, a non-profit organization that works to help companies establish sustainable supply chains.  to “focus on the systematic identification and exclusion of companies owning or managing high risk plantations or farms linked to deforestation.”

Nestle has set a goal of making its palm oil products 100 percent sustainable by 2015.  It’s currently at 18 percent.

Greenpeace’s campaign to “help” Nestle shift their palm oil practices included spurring consumers to take action with over 200,000 sent e-mail messages, hundreds of phone calls and countless Facebook comments.

So I’m a bit more optimistic this time around with another corporate giant making noises and taking action towards creating a sustainable supply chain. Who’ll be next to jump on this bandwagon?

Unilever to stop buying palm oil from Indonesia

Palm Fruit harvest in Indonesia

Palm Fruit harvest in Indonesia

Top consumer goods manufacturer Unilever has reportedly told dealers to stop buying palm oil from Indonesian planter Duta Palma due to concerns over rainforest destruction.

Unilever, who has been one of the world’s foremost palm oil buyers, halted their contract with the planter shortly after a documentary aired by the BBC which showed Duta Palma staff clearing rainforests for oil palm estates that produce the oil used in Unilever products including Dove soap and Stork margarine.

The consumer products giant uses around 1.3 million metric tons of palm oil annually. Targeted by environmentalists sand green-minded consumers for their deforestation and peatland clearance practices, Unilever has pledged to only purchase from certified sustainable palm plantations after 2015.

Deforestation makes way for palm oil plantations

Deforestation makes way for palm oil plantations

Indonesia and Malaysia produce at least 80 percent of the world’s palm oil supply.

One could be cautiously optimistic about this announcement. However, based on my observations and limited research last Fall into the real sustainability of palm oil, I wonder if perhaps this is a simply case of finding a better way of looking good while continuing to make hand-over-fist profits.