Natural Beauty with Unearthed Paints products

Unearthed Paints use natural raw ingredients in their paints - like clay, lime, chalk and Italian marble

Here in California, spring is bustin’ out all over with blooming fruit trees, nesting birds and wildflowers everywhere. With all this come thoughts of sprucing things up and household “projects”.

Before you head to the hardware or paint store, you’ll want to check out Colorado-based Unearthed Paints and their line of natural paint products.

Continue reading

Stonescent Water Diffusers – an elegant way to freshen the air

Ads for air fresheners are everywhere. From sprays to plug-ins, they promise to get rid of annoying smells, to “clean” the air – and they use chemicals and fillers to do it.

The Stonewick fragrance system brings sweet scents into your home in a greener way

Stonewick Fragrance Design has created a unique system to bring pleasant fragrances into your home. Their Stonescent Water Diffusers, their patented porous ceramic ScentSticks and their Pure Fragrances will help transform your home environment.

Simply fill a small vase with 4 to 6 ounces of water, then add four eye-droppers of the fragrance of your choice – there are six to choose from. Place three ScentStick diffusers in the vase. Within minutes, the fragrance not only fills the room it’s in but adjacent ones as well.

Continue reading

Minnesota to test removing VOC's from landfill

landfillThe Minnesota Pollution Control Agency has created a pilot project to remove volatile organic compound (VOC) contamination from the closed Waste Disposal Engineering landfill in Andover, Minnesota.

The state is testing what it calls “soil vapor extraction technology” to remove and contain the landfill contamination from an underground hazardous waste pit. They anticipate the project will continue until the end of the year.

landfill 2“We are anticipating that this project will prove to be a success. If it is, we will focus on designing a permanent extraction system at the WDE site,” said John Moeger of the MPCA´s Closed Landfill Program.

This process of “cooling, condensing and compressing gases”, as the state calls it, will pull gas from the pit into the system and convert it into liquid. The liquid will then be recycled  or  used in a fuel blending process.

Intriguing idea. If it’s successful, it could be replicated at closed landfills around the country, providing an unexpected but steady fuel source. Stay tuned.

Underwriters Laboratories now “the” Green certifier

Underwriters Laboratories has been a bastion for product safety for over a century. Now they’re working to be known as a global environmental standards certifier.

On June 2nd, UL’s five month old subsidiary, UL Environment (U.L.E.) awarded their first environmental certification to EcoRock, a recycled drywall manufactured by Serious Materials of Sunnyvale, CA.

U.L.E. began testing EcoRock in January. They verified its recycled content, tested its VOC emissions and tested for mold resistance. Now a select number of contractors in northern California are testing it.

Serious Materials plans to make EcoRock available to its 1,000 wholesalers and 40 West coast Lowe’s stores in about 2 months,, says Kevin Surace, the chief executive of Serious Materials.

Surace says the U.L.E. certification will help Serious Materials sell EcoRock panels for building projects slated for LEED certification by the US Green Building Council (USGBC).

U.L.E. is testing a number of other products, including wind turbines, dishwashers and TV’s.

Now manufacturers have a choice when it comes to certification – the standard UL product safety label and the new environmental-standards label by U.L.E.

U.L.E. plans to quickly expand its laboratories and offices. “By next year, we may have outposts in China and Japan,” said Marcello Manca, the vice president and general manager of U.L.E.. “We want to make U.L.E. more of a global presence.”

Time will tell whether this new certification gains the prestige and status of the parent company’s label. Or if manufacturers will see the advantage of spending the funds for this green come-lately.

Underwriters Laboratories now "the" Green certifier

Underwriters Laboratories has been a bastion for product safety for over a century. Now they’re working to be known as a global environmental standards certifier.

On June 2nd, UL’s five month old subsidiary, UL Environment (U.L.E.) awarded their first environmental certification to EcoRock, a recycled drywall manufactured by Serious Materials of Sunnyvale, CA.

U.L.E. began testing EcoRock in January. They verified its recycled content, tested its VOC emissions and tested for mold resistance. Now a select number of contractors in northern California are testing it.

Serious Materials plans to make EcoRock available to its 1,000 wholesalers and 40 West coast Lowe’s stores in about 2 months,, says Kevin Surace, the chief executive of Serious Materials.

Surace says the U.L.E. certification will help Serious Materials sell EcoRock panels for building projects slated for LEED certification by the US Green Building Council (USGBC).

U.L.E. is testing a number of other products, including wind turbines, dishwashers and TV’s.

Now manufacturers have a choice when it comes to certification – the standard UL product safety label and the new environmental-standards label by U.L.E.

U.L.E. plans to quickly expand its laboratories and offices. “By next year, we may have outposts in China and Japan,” said Marcello Manca, the vice president and general manager of U.L.E.. “We want to make U.L.E. more of a global presence.”

Time will tell whether this new certification gains the prestige and status of the parent company’s label. Or if manufacturers will see the advantage of spending the funds for this green come-lately.

A fascinating use of Ethanol

bankWith the introduction and growing marketing of ethanol, the loss of food corn created food shortages around the globe.

The FlameDisk Charcoal (grilling) Alternative is fueled by solid ethanol
The FlameDisk Charcoal (grilling) Alternative is fueled by solid ethanol

Regardless of this, new ethanol-based products are coming to market that manufacturers hope consumers will go wild about.  In time for hot summer days and family cook-outs, uGo has reintroduced their FlameDisk Charcoal Alternative

With claims of being environmentally-friendly, the FlameDisk boasts it will reduce carbon monoxide output by 99% and deliver 91 percent lower VOC. It’s recyclable packaging is also aimed at reducing waste.

According to Sierra Magazine,  on July 4th, Americans in the US will burn enough charcoal to power 20,000 households for one year. uGo boasts that the Flame Disk is faster, easier and cleaner than wood or charcoal burning methods and won’t alter the taste of our favorite foods.

Available online and at national hardware stores, this sounds like a cool alternative. BUT considering the product’s source (food corn diverted to make ethanol for recreational use), plus the fact that 4 ethanol production plants just filed for bankruptcy, perhaps we need to find another alternative.