Sobering view of lost wetlands from an egret’s point of view

Louisiana wetlands under siege by the Gulf, photo by Kelly Wagner, courtesy of National Wildlife Federation

Louisiana wetlands are under siege by the Gulf, photo by Kelly Wagner, courtesy of National Wildlife Federation

For those who don’t know, the state of Louisiana has lost and continues to lose large amounts of land to the sea every year. Since 1900, Louisiana has lost more than 1 million acres of wetlands and barrier shoreline.

It’s easy to ignore if you aren’t from there )and perhaps even if you are). Even with restoration efforts, progress towards reclaiming the state’s wetlands are slow.

From the perspective of native wildlife such as the egret, the effects of climate change and the rising sea are devastatingly difficult. Check out this article for more details.

Restoring the Gulf beyond Deepwater Horizon

Volunteers help plant and restore a salt marsh in Lafourche Parish, Louisiana

Since 1900, Louisiana has lost more than 1 million acres of wetlands and barrier shoreline. In just the past 50 years, more than 1,500 square miles of coastal Louisiana disappeared. The state could lose an additional 1,000 square miles of land by 2050– an area roughly the size of Rhode Island.

Since the oil spill of 2010, there has been some marshland die-off in critical marine life habitat areas like Barataria Basin. Birds and animals flock to the smaller islands of Barataria to mate and give birth. These islands were heavily oiled, resulting also in partial washing away in those areas.

To find out about the restoration efforts and challenges facing Louisiana and its wildlife, see http://bit.ly/I7xs0M.

The Gulf Oil Spill – Two Years Later

Large numbers of dolphin strandings are part of the aftermath of the 2010 Gulf oil spill

Two years have passed since Deepwater Horizon, the environmental disaster that coated the Gulf of Mexico in oil. The huge oil slicks are gone, as are the heart-wrenching pictures of dying seabirds and littered wetlands. Commercial and recreational fishing has resumed and beaches look pristine once more.

For a deeper look at how much land is still oiled, the surprising impact on marine and wildlife and a view of coastal recovery, go to http://bit.ly/JjfIfw.