Sheer Wind’s innovative wind turbine won’t harm birds

SheerWind Invelox wind turbine 1

Sheer Wind’s new wind turbine is said to produce 600 percent more power than traditional turbines

The news has shouted plenty about the dangers to eagles and other birds from wind turbines.  The problem is that turbines depend on those huge blades to help harvest wind and turn it into renewable energy we can depend on. But there’s a new guy on the block that hopes to change that.

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Solar grows up to power elevators and air conditioners

The Mezolift solar elevator

The Mezolift solar elevator

The idea of using solar to power all kinds of devices isn’t a new one. But the opportunity to ride a solar-powered elevator or tie a solar air conditioner to your solar power system is now an exciting reality.

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Putting the green in theme parks

Amusement and theme parks are getting greener these days

As consumers demand for green products increases, businesses of all kinds are jumping on the green bandwagon. So to are theme parks across the U.S. and around the world.

Many modern parks are boasting eco-friendly and sustainable features that can make you feel good about enjoying yourself.

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A Solar-Wind Turbine?

Bluenergy's Solar Wind Turbine combines 2 awesome technologies

Bluenergy's Solar Wind Turbine combines 2 awesome technologies

Put two great alternative energy technologies into one and what do you get?

Bluenergy, a Santa Fe, New Mexico start-up, has come up with a hybrid vertical axis wind turbine that’s covered with solar cells. Based on sailing engineering, the wind rotor is rotated by two spiral-formed vanes. The sun and wind produce electricity as one element.

Bluenergy Solarwind’s 5 kw double-helix design is touted to perform at wind speeds from as low as 4 mph up to 90 mph. These amazing wind turbines also  profess dual energy capture; low maintenance; and an all-important silent, safe operation for birds, humans and bats.

Standing at 18′ high by 6′ wide, these blue hued photovoltaic cells have an aesthetic appeal as well. System installation costs are relatively low. At 7 per watt, the SolarWind turbine is competitive with traditional solar and wind turbine alternatives.

When the wind blows, the solar cells are cooled by the device’s rotation, which is said to help create maximum electricity generation. This privately held company is looking for individual investors willing to pony up at least $50,000.

Coming to an Ace Hardware near you – Wind Turbines?

The Honeywell Wind Turbine is coming to Ace Hardware this fall.

The Honeywell Wind Turbine is coming to Ace Hardware this fall.

Start-up EarthTronics plans to begin selling small wind turbines directly to consumers through Ace Hardware stores this fall.

Resembling a giant wheel, the company says the turbine can start generating power with a mere 2 mph wind. The product’s upper limit is 45 miles per hour. It could generate about 2,000 kilowatt hours of electricity per year, says Brian Levine, vice president of business development.

The company will call the product Honeywell Wind Turbine under a brand licensing deal with Honeywell. Priced at at $4,500. installation costs are extra and could be as much as $1,500, Levine said. The company is carrying out a training program to train contractors and electricians on installing its product.

For more details on this amazing product, see http://3.ly/7fn.

Underwriters Laboratories now "the" Green certifier

Underwriters Laboratories has been a bastion for product safety for over a century. Now they’re working to be known as a global environmental standards certifier.

On June 2nd, UL’s five month old subsidiary, UL Environment (U.L.E.) awarded their first environmental certification to EcoRock, a recycled drywall manufactured by Serious Materials of Sunnyvale, CA.

U.L.E. began testing EcoRock in January. They verified its recycled content, tested its VOC emissions and tested for mold resistance. Now a select number of contractors in northern California are testing it.

Serious Materials plans to make EcoRock available to its 1,000 wholesalers and 40 West coast Lowe’s stores in about 2 months,, says Kevin Surace, the chief executive of Serious Materials.

Surace says the U.L.E. certification will help Serious Materials sell EcoRock panels for building projects slated for LEED certification by the US Green Building Council (USGBC).

U.L.E. is testing a number of other products, including wind turbines, dishwashers and TV’s.

Now manufacturers have a choice when it comes to certification – the standard UL product safety label and the new environmental-standards label by U.L.E.

U.L.E. plans to quickly expand its laboratories and offices. “By next year, we may have outposts in China and Japan,” said Marcello Manca, the vice president and general manager of U.L.E.. “We want to make U.L.E. more of a global presence.”

Time will tell whether this new certification gains the prestige and status of the parent company’s label. Or if manufacturers will see the advantage of spending the funds for this green come-lately.

Underwriters Laboratories now “the” Green certifier

Underwriters Laboratories has been a bastion for product safety for over a century. Now they’re working to be known as a global environmental standards certifier.

On June 2nd, UL’s five month old subsidiary, UL Environment (U.L.E.) awarded their first environmental certification to EcoRock, a recycled drywall manufactured by Serious Materials of Sunnyvale, CA.

U.L.E. began testing EcoRock in January. They verified its recycled content, tested its VOC emissions and tested for mold resistance. Now a select number of contractors in northern California are testing it.

Serious Materials plans to make EcoRock available to its 1,000 wholesalers and 40 West coast Lowe’s stores in about 2 months,, says Kevin Surace, the chief executive of Serious Materials.

Surace says the U.L.E. certification will help Serious Materials sell EcoRock panels for building projects slated for LEED certification by the US Green Building Council (USGBC).

U.L.E. is testing a number of other products, including wind turbines, dishwashers and TV’s.

Now manufacturers have a choice when it comes to certification – the standard UL product safety label and the new environmental-standards label by U.L.E.

U.L.E. plans to quickly expand its laboratories and offices. “By next year, we may have outposts in China and Japan,” said Marcello Manca, the vice president and general manager of U.L.E.. “We want to make U.L.E. more of a global presence.”

Time will tell whether this new certification gains the prestige and status of the parent company’s label. Or if manufacturers will see the advantage of spending the funds for this green come-lately.