This year’s best and worst “Green” cities


As consumers demand more green – in their products, building materials and in sustainability of companies they deal with, cities in the U.S. are ramping up their efforts to accommodate.

According to the Pew Research Center, 74 percent of Americans support efforts to protect the environment. To honor this National Energy Awareness Month, the personal-finance website conducted an in-depth analysis of 2016’s Greenest Cities in America. The website’s analysts compared the 100 largest cities across 20 key “green” indicators. These ranged from “greenhouse-gas emissions per capita” to “number of smart-energy policies and initiatives.”

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There’s hope for farmers who want to raise farm animals humanely

If you know any farmers, you know that earning a living is very difficult. Much money is spent – on equipment of all sorts, high labor costs and a myriad of other things – and the markets are volatile at best. Farmers who raise livestock – be it cattle, chickens or hogs – know that the demand from consumers for humanely raised animals is growing.

Change, however, costs money, something that’s usually in short supply for the American farmer.

But there’s hope out there and resources that farmers can reach out for to help them transition to a third-party certification of humanely raised farm animals.

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Big Food Strikes Back – a good primer about the Healthy Food “movement”


As we inch closer to November’s election, campaigning of all sorts is taking place. And the nuts and bolts of what consumers need to know is purposefully getting pretty murky.

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Genetically engineered mosquitoes could create another mosquito population disaster


Too often science makes a so-called breakthrough and we jump on its results. But also too often, we blindly leap, never considering the potential issues of the larger picture.

And here we are again.

In an article in yesterday’s Sustainable Pulse, genetic engineering company Oxitec, the company clamoring to release GE mosquitoes to deal with the Zika problem, admitted that reducing one mosquito species could likely lead to a population explosion of the Asian Tiger Mosquito.

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Gulf Coast marshes may be irreversibly damaged from Deepwater Horizon oil spill

Volunteers help plant and restore a salt marsh in Lafourche Parish, Louisiana

Volunteers help plant and restore a salt marsh in Lafourche Parish, Louisiana

Much has been written about what’s called the worst oil spill in U.S. history – Deepwater Horizon. Now there’s even a major motion picture about it.

What has only received limited national press has been the devastating effect and impact on Louisiana’s marshes, home to over 5 million migratory waterfowl each year as well a large population of brown pelicans, terns, and other tropical birds and a variety of other endangered species. A 2014 pictorial view of the Louisiana coastline was one of the few and sobering accounts of the devastation long after the fact.

Now a study, published today in the journal Scientific Reports, finds the oil spill caused widespread erosion in the salt marshes along the coasts of Louisiana, Alabama and Mississippi. And researchers say there’s a chance these marshes might never completely grow back.

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California dairy to be first to sell non-GMO certified conventional milk


There’s a lot of milk out there. And if you look carefully at the labels, you may discover that what you don’t see could be a problem. Truth is, the majority of conventional milk comes from cows that are given rBST and/or rGBH, artificial growth hormones that have been in the news a lot.

But one northern California dairy is stepping outside the norm to provide what they feel is a healthier line of milk products.

Clover Stornetta Farms, a Petaluma, California-based dairy, is betting that consumers will go for their conventional milk that isn’t organic but is healthier. They plan to replace their conventional milk with one produced without GMOs in the supply line. Continue reading

Modified wood product aims to save hardwood forests from the axe


Australia's famed hardwood tree - the Eucalyptus obliqua - could be spared in favor of 3Wood

Australia’s famed hardwood tree – the Eucalyptus obliqua – could be spared in favor of 3Wood

Waste is a terrible thing, particularly when it comes to the use of hardwood trees. The World Wildlife Fund says that about 46-58 thousand square miles of forest are lost each year. That’s a huge amount of carbon released into the atmosphere from deforestation.

David Lewis, Australia’s Flinders Centre for NanoScale Science & Technology (CNST) Director and co-developer,  says “if you take a big tree, only a small percentage of that becomes hardwood; the rest is chipped and burned.”

But there’s hope on the horizon.

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