People would buy green products if ecommerce showed they how

Green ShoppingThis blog was founded on the premise that people want to know more about green – green living, environmental issues, innovative solutions that creative minds have come up with regarding climate change issues and more. And hopefully it’s lived up to you the reader’s expectations in that regard.

I read a great article by journalist Chelsea Harvey detailing a new study showing that consumers would purchase more green, eco-friendly products and services if only they were given the options on how and/or where to do it. This included things from purchasing carbon offsets – how many of us really know how to do that? – to products that have the lowest carbon output of greenhouse gas emissions.

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Wind turbines on the Great Lakes? Not a great idea for the birds

Saw an interesting article today about how putting wind turbines on the Great Lakes could do serious harm to the birds around and migrating through the Great Lake region.

Traditional wind turbines create a horrendous level of bird kills. Endangered birds such as bald eagles, which are federally protected,  and bats – which are threatened by the white nose syndrome plague – are losing their lives in continually growing numbers due to strikes by wind turbines.

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Organic versus non-GMO certified. Which would you pick if you had all the information?

The Non-GMO ProjectSaw a great article today – taken from an interview on NPR’s All Things Considered – that examined people’s perceptions of food products that were labeled either USDA Organic or Non-GMO Project Verified. It made some very good points for both sides.

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Are Olympic athletes walking (or swimming) into an environmental and health disaster?

 

Olympic logo 2016The opening ceremony of this year’s summer Olympics is just around the corner. Festivities begin this Friday evening U.S. time.(7pm Eastern time). Yet despite the hype, advertising and anticipation, athletes and attendees will have to contend with some serious issues – both environmental and health-related – that could put them at risk.

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Ukraine wants to turn Chernobyl into a massive solar farm. It’s money versus Nature and commonsense all over again

Chernobyl pripyat building

A story recently hit the news that Ukraine is seeking investors to turn radiation-riddled Chernobyl into a massive solar farm. If successful, it would produce 1 gigawatt of power from an array in the 1,000 square mile “exclusion zone.”

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How a new source of water is helping reduce conflict in the Middle East

Editor:   The following is an excerpt of an article by Rowan Jacobsen. It offers an intriguing idea and opportunity that not only could help bring water to countries (and villages) parched by continuing drought but also help resolve conflicts between warring nations.

Scientists and others look to desalination as a way to unite longtime enemies in a common cause.

Israel's Sorek Desalination Plant - an opportunity for water and easing conflicts

Israel’s Sorek Desalination Plant – an opportunity for water and easing conflicts

Ten miles south of Tel Aviv, I stand on a catwalk over two concrete reservoirs the size of football fields and watch water pour into them from a massive pipe emerging from the sand. The pipe is so large I could walk through it standing upright, were it not full of Mediterranean seawater pumped from an intake a mile offshore.

“Now, that’s a pump!” Edo Bar-Zeev shouts to me over the din of the motors, grinning with undisguised awe at the scene before us. The reservoirs beneath us contain several feet of sand through which the seawater filters before making its way to a vast metal hangar, where it is transformed into enough drinking water to supply 1.5 million people.

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Why Australia’s loss of 7,000 hectares of mangroves will have serious consequences

Dead mangrove forest off Australia's east coast, photo by James Cook University

Dead mangrove forest off Australia’s east coast, photo by James Cook University

Climate change has wrecked havoc not only on our weather patterns but on the world’s forest and ecological systems. And the impact is devastating.

In the U.S., severe drought and major insect infestations have been responsible for almost unimaginable die-offs of old growth forests. In Australia El Nino conditions have caused the die-off of a 7000 kilometer (approximately 4,349 miles) stretch of mangrove shoreline in the southern reaches of the Gulf of Carpentaria.

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